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covid 19 symtomsPNC Test Site Will Open Monday, Residents Should Do Homework Before Heading to Site

O’Scanlon, DiMaso & Scharfenberger announced the opening of the PNC Bank Arts Center testing site at 8am Monday, March 23rd and cautioned residents to not get tested if they aren’t showing serious symptoms. (CDC)

TRENTON, NJ - Senator Declan O’Scanlon, Assemblywoman Serena DiMaso, and Assemblyman Gerry Scharfenberger (R-Monmouth) announced the opening of the PNC Bank Arts Center testing site in Holmdel at 8AM Monday March 23rd, and cautioned residents to not get tested if they aren’t showing serious symptoms.

Governor Murphy announced in a press conference today that the testing site at Bergen Community College had tested 600 people before 2pm. News articles also displayed a line 3 miles long prior to its opening at 8am this morning.

“As we progress in our COVID-19 response we know that our supply of PPE, testing kits, and healthcare staff is severely limited,” DiMaso continued. “What we can’t have is hundreds of the worried well lining up outside this center, we already know the demand and line for this site will be overwhelming. With the typical flu and allergy season among us, we need to ensure that people who suspect they have allergies or a cold are not attempting to be tested when our supplies are currently limited. We understand that people are concerned but we need to prioritize resources, and that includes the limited number of healthcare workers we have. ”

In order to be tested at PNC residents would need to present a valid NJ ID and be showing respiratory symptoms and fever.

“We understand the heavy amount of stress and concern everyone is under,” said Scharfenberger. “But we ask that residents please refrain from visiting the PNC testing site unless they have symptoms and/or have been exposed to COVID-19 in some way. This will allow for testing to reach those most in need while getting them immediate medical attention.”

“Unless you would go to a doctor under normal conditions, don’t go now. What we are really asking is for the individuals who believe they are sick but don’t need immediate medical attention to stay home, stay away from other people, rest and heal. We’ve got to preserve as much of our resources as possible and limit the strain on our healthcare systems. That works by folks who are sick but wouldn’t typically go to the doctor for it, to simply stay at home, rest and get better. The priority at this point is the very sick, and I’m sorry to say that the sniffles won’t cut it here.” O’Scanlon concluded.

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